Carrot and its Health Benefit

 

Carrots are perhaps best known for their rich supply of the antioxidant nutrient and it’s made up of vitamin A. With this orange-colour crunchy power food , it makes your skin beautiful, prevents cancer and also good for anti-aging. The name “carrot” comes from the Greek word “Karoton”

 

Fresh carrots            Carrot5

 

Carrots have antiseptic qualities and can therefore be used as laxatives, vermicides and as a remedy for liver conditions. Carrot oil is good for dry skin because it makes the skin softer, smoother and firmer. Furthermore, carrot juice improves stomach and gastrointestinal health.

 

Carrot1          carrot12

 

Benefits of Carrots

  • Enhance good vision : Carrot is good for eye vision as it contains vitamin A.
  • Prevent cancer: Studies have shown carrots reduce the risk of lung cancer, breast cancer and colon cancer. Researchers have just discovered falcarinol and falcarindiol which they feel cause the anticancer properties.
  • Slows down aging: The high level of beta-carotene helps slow down the aging of cells.
  • Promotes healthier skin: Vitamin A and antioxidants protects the skin from sun damage. Deficiencies of vitamin A cause dryness to the skin, hair and nails. Vitamin A prevents premature wrinkling, acne, dry skin, pigmentation, blemishes, and uneven skin tone.
  • Brain Health: Carrots offer memory improvement and cholesterol-lowering benefits.
  • Liver Protection: Carrot extract may help to protect your liver from the toxic effects of environmental chemicals.
  • Diabetes: Carrots are good for blood sugar regulation due to the presence of carotenoids in this delicious vegetable. Carotenoids inversely affect insulin resistance and thus lower blood sugar, thereby helping diabetic patients live a normal, healthy life. They also regulate the amount of insulin and glucose that is being used and metabolized by the body, providing a more even and healthy fluctuation for diabetic patients.
  • Prevent infection: Carrots are known by herbalists to prevent infection. They can be used on cuts – shredded raw or boiled and mashed.
  • Promotes healthier skin (from the outside): Carrots are used as an inexpensive and very convenient facial mask. Just mix grated carrot with a bit of honey.
  • Prevent heart disease: The regular consumption of carrots also reduces cholesterol levels because the soluble fibers in carrots bind with bile acids.
  • Cleanses the body: Vitamin A assists the liver in flushing out the toxins from the body. It reduces the bile and fat in the liver. The fibers present in carrots help clean out the colon and hasten waste movement.
  • Protects teeth and gums: It’s all in the crunch! Carrots clean your teeth and mouth. They scrape off plaque and food particles just like toothbrushes or toothpaste. Carrots stimulate gums and trigger a lot of saliva, which being alkaline, balances out the acid-forming, cavity-forming bacteria. The minerals in carrots prevent tooth damage.
  • Prevents stroke: From all the above benefits it is no surprise that in a Harvard University study, people who ate more than six carrots a week are less likely to suffer a stroke than those who ate only one carrot a month or less.

Precautions

Beware of “Baby Carrot”. Baby carrots are not actually ‘baby’ carrots at all but rather are less-than-perfect carrots that have been shaved down to a smaller size. Not only are baby carrots more expensive than whole carrots, they’re also typically given a chlorine bath to prolong shelf life. For this reason, I generally recommend purchasing whole carrots instead of baby carrots, and also recommend seeking to find organically grown varieties, as at one time carrots were part of the most heavily pesticide-laden produce list.

Also, Overconsumption of vitamin A can be toxic to humans, but is not likely to be achieved through diet alone . Overconsumption of carotene may cause a slight orange tinge in skin color but is not harmful to health.

This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

 

 

 

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